Unreal Engine 5: hands-on with Epics next-gen technology – Eurogamer.net

At its maximum ‘impressive’ settings, the demonstration targets 1080p at 30 frames per second on PS5 and Xbox Series X. However, another new technology – Temporal Super Resolution (TSR) uses smart upscaling to deliver a persuading 4K presentation. The idea of this being a 1080p30 presentation has raised some eyebrows, but this is UE5 running at epic settings and the Lumen international lighting option is around twice as heavy on efficiency as the preliminary PS5 demo we saw last year (which ran at circa 1400p). Not even an overclocked RTX 3090 can run the demonstration totally locked at 60 frames per 2nd at 1080p TSRed up to 4K. I likewise tried the demo on a Razer video gaming laptop computer with an RTX 2070 (equivalent in efficiency terms to a desktop RTX 2060 with more RAM) and had no issue with 1080p30 – a native 1080p, with no TSR that is. If you simply desire to see what the project looks like, the demo capture we put together running on RTX 3090 pretty much reveals you how it looks running at its best.

Last week, Epic launched Unreal Engine 5 for early access, together with a sample demonstration project – Valley of the Ancient – for designers to check out. Vital to UE5 are two basic brand-new innovations: Nanite, which aims to provide something similar to ‘boundless information’ and Lumen, a cutting-edge worldwide illumination option. At its optimum ‘impressive’ settings, the demonstration targets 1080p at 30 frames per second on PS5 and Xbox Series X. However, another brand-new innovation – Temporal Super Resolution (TSR) utilizes smart upscaling to provide a persuading 4K presentation. This is cutting-edge things and having now invested some time with UE5 on PC, we have some impressions and initial efficiency numbers.

Of all, there’s nothing to stop anyone downloading this preliminary early access version of UE5, and you can do so for complimentary. It is worth bearing in mind that this is far from the total rendition of the code and key functions and optimisations are missing out on. Over and above the engine download itself, the Valley of the Ancient demo project is a separate 100GB download. This is using raw assets though – an assembled construct clocks in at around 25GB. When it comes to the demonstration material itself, it’s quite simple, and we’ve got a sample run-through shown operating on an RTX 3080 further on down the page. Essentially, you get some exploration elements allowing you to value the massive quality of the discussion (and how Nanite can provide a huge open world) plus a manager battle to flaunt more interactivity.

Alex Battaglia and John Linneman share their very first impressions of try out Unreal Engine 5 and the Valley of the Ancient demo.

The notion of this being a 1080p30 demonstration has actually raised some eyebrows, however this is UE5 performing at impressive settings and the Lumen worldwide illumination solution is around twice as heavy on performance as the initial PS5 demo we saw in 2015 (which ran at circa 1400p). Things stacking of multiple discrete Nanite fits together to produce the world likewise provides extra overhead. Nevertheless, TSR truly provides an impressive upscaling option – not rather as crisp and tidy at a native 4K output, however certainly equivalent, and far beyond real 1080p native. There has actually been some conjecture that this new demonstration is a multi-platform ‘downgrade’ compared to in 2015’s PS5 demo, however this has actually been shot down by Epic’s engineering fellow (graphics) Brian Karis, who has actually verified in a live stream that the last demonstration runs simply great on PCs and Xbox Series X too.

What to make of this hands-on chance? Put just, Nanite works. It permits you to bring the cam as close as you wish to any in-world item and the information level is stunning – restricted just by the level of information as the things was imported into UE5 itself. There can be disparity in quality if numerous assets have various levels of geometric or texture density, and if they’re displayed in close proximity. I think the real achievement with Nanite isn’t necessarily the large level of detail, however more the continuity in providing that detail throughout the board without any LOD pop-in issues. On the other hand, I’ve not spent a great deal of time taking a look at Lumen as this technology is still growing, but you are getting remarkable light bounce impacts and there are more observations on its qualities in the video ingrained above.

Just here for the eye candy? Here’s how the Valley of the Ancient demonstration runs and looks maxed on an RTX 3090.

We’re seeing some revolutionary technology here and undoubtedly, there is a price to pay. Not even an overclocked RTX 3090 can run the demo fully locked at 60 frames per second at 1080p TSRed as much as 4K. CPU-wise, an AMD Ryzen 5 3600 – broadly equivalent to console efficiency – falls just short of delivering 60fps, however higher-end PC parts can manage this. While intending for 60fps on the graphics side has a monstrous requirement, I actually found that more mainstream-orientated GPUs like the RTX 2060 Super and the RX 5700 could mainly provide frame-rates north of 30fps, with an RTX 2070 Super offering a lot more overhead. I likewise tried the demonstration on a Razer gaming laptop computer with an RTX 2070 (equivalent in efficiency terms to a desktop RTX 2060 with more RAM) and had no problem with 1080p30 – a native 1080p, with no TSR that is. I ‘d say that there is scalability here, but I’m curious to see if 60fps with these technologies will prove feasible.

Certainly, it’s early days with Unreal Engine 5, but it’s fantastic to see Epic pushing visuals to an entire new level in a number of aspects. If you’re technically inclined, having a look at the UE5 early access release is absolutely recommended – and it’s certainly enjoyable to experiment with the Valley of the Ancient task. If you simply desire to see what the project looks like, the demonstration capture we assembled operating on RTX 3090 practically reveals you how it looks performing at its best. Going forward, it’s how Lumen and Nanite will manifest in actual video games that intrigues us most – and with designers like Ninja Theory and The Coalition signed up to UE5, ideally we’ll get to see something more ‘game-like’ sooner rather than later on.

Plus a more detailed look at the Valley of the Ancient demonstration.

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