Le Mans 2021: How new hypercar rules are shaking up the grid – Autocar

The appeal is easy: every maker will head to Le Mans knowing that, if they perform well, they need to have an opportunity of success. The outcome is two similar-but-different plans: the WEC’s Le Mans Hypercar (LMH) guidelines and, from next year, the US-based IMSA Sportscar Championship’s Le Mans Daytona Hybrid (LMDh) formula. The contract in between the various rules organisers (motorsport’s governing body, the FIA; Le Mans’ organiser, the ACO; and North America’s sports vehicle racing approving body, IMSA) has actually been essential to ensuring that the 2 brand-new rules packages converge. In both classes, peak power output is pegged at 670bhp. The goal is to produce vehicles that lap Le Mans’ 8.467-mile Circuit de la Sarthe in around 3min 30sec– about 10 seconds slower than a current LMP1 cars and truck– while cutting expenses and increasing competition.

The outcome is 2 similar-but-different packages: the WEC’s Le Mans Hypercar (LMH) rules and, from next year, the US-based IMSA Sportscar Championship’s Le Mans Daytona Hybrid (LMDh) formula. The arrangement between the numerous rules organisers (motorsport’s governing body, the FIA; Le Mans’ organiser, the ACO; and North America’s sports vehicle racing sanctioning body, IMSA) has been essential to making sure that the two brand-new guidelines bundles converge. In both classes, peak power output is pegged at 670bhp.

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